5 Seaside Getaways from San Francisco, CA

  1. Sausalito, CA

This artists’ village is just off the Golden Gate Bridge in upscale Marin County. Most of the small city offers a spectacular view of the Golden Gate Bridge, Richardson Bay, and many houseboats in the bay. It’s a popular day-trip destination, with sheer cliffs and a rugged shoreline dotted with trails and villages. Personally, Sausalito reminds me of the Pacific version of the Amalfi Coast! You can use this as a jumping-off point for many of the nearby hikes such as Mount Tamalpais (“Mt. Tam”), the leisurely Tennessee Valley Trail, and Alamere Falls. Spend some time checking out the many galleries, stores and restaurants. Any trip to Sausalito, I love perusing handmade dinnerware at Heath Ceramics (400 Gate 5 Rd, Sausalito, CA 94965)

  1. Carmel, CA

Carmel-by-the-Sea is a small beach city on the Monterey Peninsula, two hours south of San Francisco. Historically a Bohemian artists’ village, Carmel-by-the-Sea has been home to many famous people such as Doris Day, John Madden, Ansel Adams, and John Steinbeck. Clint Eastwood was not only a resident, he was elected Mayor of Carmel. This picturesque city of less than 4,000 residents features unique homes including many cottages with minute detailing valued in the millions because of the location. One house which we viewed was decorated with heart-shaped cut-outs decorating the picket fence, the shingles, and gracefully furbishing the interior decorative trim. The lush gardens roll into each other in ever flowing bloom. This is worth a day-trip for a coastal walk and a stroll around the interesting shops, restaurants, and homes.  For a more in depth itinerary check out A Day in… Carmel, Ca!

  1. Santa Cruz Mountains and Capitola, CA

The Santa Cruz Mountains are dappled with houses among wooded forest and many trails to hike. Skip the honky tonk in Santa Cruz proper, and instead head to Capitola Village. Capitola Village developed as a seaside resort when the Soquel Mountains were a thriving location of the lumber industry.  The small downtown area is worth a stroll to look at the Soquel Canal, and iconic Capitola Venetian with it’s brightly colored guest suites. There is a beautiful and brief (10 minute) pedestrian walk along the Soquel Creek. One hour south of San Francisco, the Santa Cruz Mountains are great to slow down and enjoy the serene nature that California has to offer. For a more in depth itinerary check out A Day… in the Santa Cruz Mountains & Soquel Cove!

  1. Half Moon Bay
Part of the walk Coastal Walk near Moss Beach, CA

Half Moon Bay is a charming seaside town approximately 45 minutes south of San Francisco. I enjoy the beautiful Coastal Trail, which is about 11 miles of leisurely coast side walking roads with beautiful waterfront views. The Ritz Carlton in Half Moon Bay offers free parking for the public who would like to visit the beach. Walk all the way north to Cypress Ave on Moss Beach and back. I enjoy grabbing a beer from Half Moon Bay Brewing company in Princeton Harbor. When the pandemic ends, watch the sunset with a glass of wine and dinner over the fire pit at Moss Beach Distillery, situated on the cliffs overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Beware: Moss Beach Distillery is supposed to be haunted by the ghost of the “Blue Lady”. 

Please note: On the coastal trail, Princeton Harbor does not have a trail and you will have to walk on the streets.

  1. Tomales Bay
Outdoor seating at Hog Island Oyster in Marshall, CA

Road trip along east coast of Tomales Bay. From San Francisco our first stop on Route 1 was Point Reyes Station, the small town which developed around a (now) bygone railroad station. The whole town reminds me of the “Wild West”, with mostly country roads surrounding it. The town prides itself on local produce, agriculture, and organic food. We bought lunch at Cowgirl Creamery in the picturesque Tomales Bay Foods, which has been renovated from an old hay barn. The tiny town has Bovine Bakery, which is worth a delicious pastry! The area has a Farmers Market on Saturday Mornings. Second stop on our coastal road trip is Hog Island Oyster (Marshall, Ca), to relax and shuck your own oysters. It is surprisingly a lot harder than I thought! We brought our CowGirl Creamery picnic here. We spent quite a bit of time relaxing and enjoying the views. Last stop on our road trip was: Nick’s Cove, with renovated historic seaside cottages and restaurant. We ended our road trip here for a glass of wine and a little snack. The beautiful Point Reyes National Seashore is a great day getaway that is often overlooked. The natural landscape also provides many options for hikers, bikers and beach side day trippers. Next time I make it up there, I am going to try to bike!

Cheers to your summer getaways!

A day in…Red Hook, Brooklyn!

Red Hook’s waterfront cobblestone streets give this refurbished neighborhood the ambiance of a quaint, seaside town. It is the home to numerous pre-civil war maritime warehouses converted to art galleries, restaurants and Ample Hills, Brooklyn’s favorite ice cream shop. 

Red Hook was settled by the Dutch in the 17th century.  During the American Civil War, Red Hook was the location of Fort Defiance, and later was a hub for international trade. Remnants of this era are still evident today.

Much of Red Hook was built in the mid to late 1800’s when William Beard, an Irish immigrant, purchased the land for a shipping business. He had made his fortune as a railroad contractor and continued to grow his assets by creating the Erie Basin. Now much of the estimated $170 million Red Hook warehouses are owned by a former Drug Cop, Greg O’Connell. O’Connell bought the formerly abandoned warehouses from the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for $450,000. I wish I had that foresight!

Eventually, the bustling shipping industry went elsewhere, and Red Hook went into disrepair in the 1950’s with the creation of the Brooklyn Queens Expressway (“BQE”) and Battery Tunnel which cut the neighborhood off from the rest of Brooklyn. Red Hook is also home to one of the largest public housing complex in New York City, having over 2,800 apartments; one of which is the birthplace of basketball player Carmelo Anthony. 

Red Hook is a peninsula jutting out into Upper New York Bay.  It is distinct for its equal parts of fisherman’s village, artist enclave and rehabilitated multi-use warehouses.  While Red Hook can be enjoyed any time of the year, the best time is during the warmer months from April through October. 

Transportation: my favorite means of transportation to Red Hook is either by ferry or bike. Here is a one-day itinerary:

Morning:

A “healthy” morning pastry…

Start your morning off at the quaint pastry shop, Baked (359 Van Brunt St), for coffee and a pastry. To burn off the pastry, walk the three blocks to Louis Valentino, Jr Park where you can rent free paddle boards and kayaks through the Red Hook Boaters during summer months. Spend a few hours taking in the breathtaking Panoramic views of the Statue of Liberty, the Manhattan skyline, and the Brooklyn Bridge.  

After kayaking indulge in a slice of key lime pie from Steve’s Authentic Key Lime Pies. The family owned business has been around for 23 years. The proprietor and namesake, Steve ensure quality by using fresh squeezed limes and homemade crust. 

Window shop along Van Brunt St. Red Hook is home to a number of boutique stores, art galleries and even a record shop.  

Whiskey tasting in Red Hook.

Sip some whiskey with a tasting at  Van Brunt Stillhouse (6 Bay St, Tasting room hours: 2-9 on Saturday or 2-8 on Sunday, Tours 3-7PM on Saturdays) and/or Widow Jane’s (218 Conover Street Tasting room hours Sat and Sun 11-7, Tours 12, 2, 4, and 6pm). Soak up the malted barley with a lobster roll from the Red Hook Lobster Pound. 

Early Evening:

If it is the second Sunday of the month check out Pioneer Works, an artist run community center. Located in a former Iron Works building from the 1800’s that has been redesigned. They host free ‘Second Sundays’ with music, food, and a cash bar. Visitors are able to see the artists-in residency at work. More information can be found by clicking here. Most of the artists utilizes the cross section of technology and art, so don’t expect typical paintings instead its virtual reality-esque projections and social justice themed artwork. 

Red Hook has two iconic dinner spots:

Hometown BBQ (454 Van Brunt St), offers southern style pit smoked meats. 

Brooklyn Crab (24 Reed St, Brooklyn, NY 11231) three story seafood shack with corn hole and mini golf on the ground level. If you already got a lobster roll, I would go for the BBQ!

Evening:

After dinner relax with a movie under the stars back at Valentino Pier. At 8:30 PM in the summer, the Red Hook Flicks screens different movies on the pier. 

Savour a nightcap at Sunny’s:

Me and some girlfriends posing in front of Sunny’s!

As the website accurately describes it, the “knickknack-adorned Red Hook saloon that’s been around in one guise or another since the 1890s. Live music is a staple at this Brooklyn landmark.”

For those who do not want to indulge in libations, I recommend a scoop of ice cream from Ample Hills Creamery (421 Van Brunt St). The factory is able to churn out 500,000 gallons of ice cream in a year! 

Other unique bars, that are enjoyable with a group of friends: Brooklyn Winery (with great sunset views) and Sixpoint Brewery.

If you enjoy learning more about NYC, consider checking out some of my A Day in itineraries in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.