A Mystical Two Days in Meteora, Greece

The sandstone columns topped with ornate monasteries provide a breathtaking backdrop to the sleepy town of Kalambaka and the neighboring village of Kastraki. I am sure the mountainous northern region of mainland Greece is not what you expect when thinking of a Greek getaway.

The majestic cliff-top monasteries of Meteora will awe you into feeling like you are the star of a Lord of the Rings movie. Two days in this UNESCO World Heritage Site provide a unique refuge from the hustle and bustle of Athens or island-hopping festivities. Each monastery provides centuries’ worth of history and an instagram-worthy photo-shoot. Meteora allows any tourist to admire nature and ponder the lives of the early inhabitants of this distinctive, stunning  location.

The rickety wooden ladders and pulleys were used for access to these locations and were only replaced when they broke (hope no one was on it!) You could not pay me any amount of money to try the ladders.

Meteora’s religious community dates back to a few solo hermitages in the early 11th century. The dilapidated, wooden hermitages were used until the 19th century. Eventually (mostly during the 14th and 15th century) numerous monks moved here and created the beautiful monasteries and a larger skete community devoted to the austere way of life.

Getting there: Kalambaka is a 4 hour drive or a 5 hour train ride (~30 euros) from Athens. I took the train and was able to walk to my accommodation a few blocks away. Please see the website to book trains here. I chose to make sure I did not have to switch trains, since I do not know the language and my understanding of the Greek alphabet is solely based on my college sorority days. Typically, I take a screenshot of the directions from my hotel in Athens to the train station, and then from the train station in Meteora to my local hotel, so that I know the directions once I depart the train, even if my phone has no service.

While I chose to hike up and then walk between the monasteries, I would only recommend this to those who consider themselves fit. You will do a reasonable amount of unshaded walking between the monasteries.

Tips: For my entire time in Meteora I chose to hike. While this is the norm for a good portion of the people in Meteora there are other transportation options for every type of traveller, including taxis, public busses, or chartered bus tours. Choose whichever suits your fitness level and travel style. I recommend packing sunprotection and an additional layer, both for respite from the sun, and also for entrance into the monasteries as guests are expected to cover their shoulders and legs. Women are not allowed entrance into some monasteries without a skirt. All of the monasteries have a three euros, cash only, entrance fee.

Timing: If you want to see all of the monasteries, I would recommend 1.5 days and 2 nights in Meteora, as the six monasteries have different days and hours that they are open. Otherwise, you could see some of the monasteries in one full day and night. I went during the summer, so I had some down-time after seeing all the monasteries and before sunset. Meteora was great in summer and I have heard good things about the fall foliage. This can easily be added to the beginning or end of a ten day itinerary in Greece.

Day 1: Sunset

Sunset at “Psaropetra Lookout”

Arrive in Meteora in the late afternoon, check into your hotel. Make it to “Psaropetra Lookout” for breathtaking panoramic sunsets on the mountain top. The location is clearly marked on maps, and your hotel can arrange for a taxi. Get a late dinner in Kalambaka before getting to bed in time for an early morning. Meteora is known for its religious pilgrimages and trekking tourism, so don’t be surprised to find at least one orthodox priest at every restaurant you go to. That being said there is not much in the way of vibrant nightlife. I wanted to experience the full village life and only went to tavernas (small Greek restaurants), all of which were inexpensive. The three taverna restaurants I recommend are: Taverna Paramithi (has live music), Taverna Gardenia (in Kastraki), and Archontariki Taverna. Enjoy eating in both Kastraki and Kalambaka once, just to compare the two villages.

Day 2: Hiking and Monasteries

Check on opening and closing times to determine which monasteries you are going to see on which days. I decided to make a loop of the monasteries that were open, but save two for the following day. I woke up early so I could arrive at the first monastery at opening time. Travelling from Kalambaka it was roughly a  3.4 mile (~5500 meter) hike to Moni Agias Triados (Holy Trinity) (open from 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, but closed on Thursdays.) Be prepared to climb up stone mountain stairs in order to get to the entrance. For any 007 fans, this monastery was featured in the 1981 James Bond film For your Eyes Only.

Our second event involved a 15 minute walk east along the main road (okay, it took us longer because we  stopped for picture-taking) to Moni Agias Stefanou (open hours 9:00AM-1:30 PM & 3:30 PM-5:30 PM, but closed on Mondays.) Beware of the break in the middle of the day. The entrance is a small bridge with a terrifying drop!

Our next trek involved 4 km walk (which took about an hour) to Moni Varlaam (open hours: 9:00 AM-4:00 PM, but closed on Fridays.) A visit to Moni Varlaam should be combined with a visit to Moni Megalou, which is fifteen minutes away.

Moni Megalou Meteorou, or “Grand Meteoron” (open hours: 9:00 AM -5:00 PM, but closed on Tuesdays) is the most impressive of the monasteries.  Founded in the 14th century, it became the richest monastery when the Serbian Emperor Symeon Uros donated all of his money and became a monk. One can walk back to town from here or ask an attendant for directions to the bus stop.

Evening: see Day 1 Sunset itinerary, and repeat with a different dinner location.

Day 3: Half day of hiking and monasteries

For Day-3, we did a reverse loop, what I call the “Kastraki loop,” as that was our starting point. Give yourself some time to hike a few of the sights near Kastraki, such as St. George Mantilas, the ruins of old cave dwellings, and St. Nicholas Bantovas, a still-functioning monastery.

View from a monks dormatory in Moni Agiou Nikolaou

We stopped at Moni Agiou Nikolaou (English: St. Nicholas; open hours: 9:00 AM-3:30 PM, but closed on Fridays) which is about 0.2 km from Kastraki village square.

Our last visit was to Moni Agias Varvaras Rousanou (open hours: 9:00 AM-5:45 PM, but closed on Wednesdays.) Near closing time, be alert for the call to vespers (evening prayer) made by a wooden talando.

If you are going at a relaxed pace, you can stay another night in Kalambaka. For those with a tighter schedule, I would recommend leaving in the late afternoon to your next destination.

For an easier visual here are the two hiking routes I created in numeric form.

“Kalambaka loop”, starts in Kalambaka:

  1. Moni Agias Triados (Holy Trinity) (open from 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, but closed on Thursdays.) This is roughly a  3.4 mile (~5500 meter) hike from Kalambaka town.
  2. Moni Agias Stefanou (open hours 9:00AM-1:30 PM & 3:30 PM-5:30 PM, but closed on Mondays.) This is 15 minutes east from Moni Agias Triados.
  3. Moni Agias Varvaras Rousanou (open hours: 9:00 AM-5:45 PM, but closed on Wednesdays.)
  4. Moni Varlaam (open hours: 9:00 AM-4:00 PM, but closed on Fridays.) A visit to Moni Varlaam should be combined with a visit to Moni Megalou, which is fifteen minutes away.
  5. Moni Megalou Meteorou, or “Grand Meteoron” (open hours: 9:00 AM -5:00 PM, but closed on Tuesdays), there is a hiking path to get here which is shaded. At the T, so to the left which will lead to the entrance.
  6. Moni Agiou Nikolaou (English: St. Nicholas; open hours: 9:00 AM-3:30 PM, but closed on Fridays) which is about 0.2 km from Kastraki village square.

“Kastraki loop,” starts in Kastraki:

  1. Moni Agiou Nikolaou (English: St. Nicholas; open hours: 9:00 AM-3:30 PM, but closed on Fridays) which is about 0.2 km from Kastraki village square.
  2. Moni Megalou Meteorou, or “Grand Meteoron” (open hours: 9:00 AM -5:00 PM, but closed on Tuesdays), there is a hiking path to get here which is shaded. At the T, go to the left which will lead to the entrance. This is a less travelled hiking area but the path is clearly demarcated.
  3. Moni Varlaam (open hours: 9:00 AM-4:00 PM, but closed on Fridays.) A visit to Moni Varlaam should be combined with a visit to Moni Megalou, which is fifteen minutes away.
  4. Moni Agias Varvaras Rousanou (open hours: 9:00 AM-5:45 PM, but closed on Wednesdays.) Near closing time, be alert for the call to vespers (evening prayer) made by a wooden talando.
  5. Moni Agias Stefanou (open hours 9:00AM-1:30 PM & 3:30 PM-5:30 PM, but closed on Mondays.) This is 15 minutes east from Agias Triados, so you will pass Agias Triados Agias Stefanou then backtrack to Agias Triados.
  6. Moni Agias Triados (Holy Trinity) (open from 9:00 AM-5:00 PM, but closed on Thursdays.) This is then a downhill walk back to Kalambaka town center, which you can either walk back to Kastraki or stay here.


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